Cricket Chirp

Crickets are named for the high-pitched sounds male specimens produce to attract females. This chirp is created when the front wings are rubbed together and is amplified by wing surface. Different species of cricket produce distinctive and identifiable sounds.

The chirping has various meanings for certain cultures. Some cultures regard the chirp as an indication of good luck or a sign of rain. Other cultures consider it a bad sign and believe it can indicate impending illness or death.

The house cricket is known for producing a loud, continuous chirp at night, while the chirp of the field cricket is less high-pitched but occurs both day and night. Camel crickets do not produce songs.

Temperature may also dictate the number of chirps produced by a cricket. Faster and more continuous chirping is possible at higher temperatures. A cricket’s chirping can be used to approximate the temperature in Fahrenheit. Count the number of chirps in 15 seconds and add 40. The number is not exact and does vary somewhat depending on species.