20120616 Orkin Food Processing Shoot 0521

3 Forms of Documentation to Have on Hand for Third-Party Audits

Managing a food processing plant is no easy task. To achieve food safety, routine third-party audits are essential. So, how can food processing facility managers maintain a textbook, audit-ready environment? Even with regular facility maintenance and pest management measures, managers may still lose points unexpectedly in the pest control portion of their audit. With proper pest control documentation, any facility can make the grade.

To ace your next third-party audit, keep the following on file:

  1. General Facility Documentation
    First, let’s get specific about general documentation. Auditors need to see a written copy of your Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program, which should include your facility’s risk assessment and food safety rules as they apply to pest management. A suitable copy will have been endorsed by necessary parties and updated within the past 12 months to include information on program changes and recent inspections. Managers will also need to provide proof of an annual facility assessment, which is conducted by a trained IPM professional and details an evaluation of the processing plant. A pro-tip from the pros? Be sure to keep these documents up to date—as your facility grows, so will the requirements of your IPM program.
  1.  Proof of Training and Certification
    When it comes to training and certification, the proof is in the papers. Auditors will expect on-site proof that your pest management provider is properly handling and using pest management materials, like verification of yearly GMP training and a copy of the pest management company’s certificate of insurance and license. Proof of training and certification will show auditors that you’re partnering with a pest provider that can execute a quality pest control strategy.
  1. Pesticide Documentation
    Next, auditors will look for insights on your use of pesticides. Any pesticide usage and applications inside the facility should be kept on file—proper pesticide documentation should include Safety Data Sheets (SDS) and pesticide labels. The right pesticide documentation will show auditors that preserving a safe, secure food processing environment is your top priority.

Curious about the other forms of documentation? As with any exam, the best way to prepare is to study up. Download the full Documentation Checklist to help pass every third-party audit that comes your way. For even more information on audits, visit myauditprep.com for customized tips for your organization.

Want more? You might also like:

iStock 476592706

How Food Processing Managers Should Document Pest Management Activity

Part of helping maintain a pest-free food processing facility involves tracking your Integrated Pest Management (IPM) efforts. For managers, this means having the right documentation on hand to monitor trend data and determine whether changes to the program are necessary. While this documentation is …

iStock 1025052474

The Top 3 “Hot Spots” Inside Your Facility

As much as you prioritize keeping pests out of your facility, something has slipped past your preventive measures. You’re not alone – food processing facilities have so much to offer pests. From dry goods and moisture to warmth and dark spaces. To help you narrow down your search for invaders, we’ve …

iStock 478025456 1

The Importance of Equipment Sanitation at Your Food Processing Facility

Your food processing operations are a well-oiled machine. And speaking of well-oiled machines, your processing equipment is not only the lifeblood of your production, it can be the lifeblood for pests without proper attention. Your equipment is an important investment that you need to keep investin …