Bottle Flies

Facts, Identification & Control

Latin Name

Family Calliphoridae

Appearance

What Do They Look Like?

bottle flies

Bottle flies, also called blow flies, are common, large flies known for their metallic blue or green color.

How Did I Get Bottle Flies?

These pests get into homes through open doors, windows, or small cracks in walls in search of food. Once inside, bottle flies find a meal and begin to deposit eggs on its surface.

How Serious Are Bottle Flies?

Disease Transmission
These flies transfer infections to humans through contaminating food and food preparation surfaces. Also, it is possible to transfer disease organisms when a bottle fly comes into contact with an open wound or lesion on people, livestock, or pets. When the insects feed, pathogens attach to their bodies. Bottle flies can spread dysentery, eye infections, and other illnesses.

Related Problems
A bottle fly infestation often indicates a more serious issue. These pests gather in large numbers around carrion. An indoor swarm is a sign of an animal carcass trapped in an attic or wall void.

Signs of a Bottle Fly Infestation

The most common signs of bottle flies are either the adults themselves or their larvae. The adults may be seen resting on surfaces or buzzing around potential food or odor sources. The larvae may be observed when they crawl out of the breeding material to pupate.

How Do I Get Rid of Bottle Flies?

Your local Orkin technician is trained to help manage bottle flies and similar pests. Since every building or home is different, your Orkin technician will design a unique program for your situation.

Orkin can provide the right solution to keep bottle flies in their place…out of your home, or business.


Behavior, Diet & Habits

Where Do They Live?
Bottle flies are typically found outdoors. If large numbers of the pests are found inside, an indoor breeding site may have been established. To eliminate bottle flies, it is important to implement stringent sanitation measures, which include cleaning garbage containers and making sure that the lids are seated tightly.

What Do They Eat?
Among many other kinds of decomposing organic matter, the following serve as the insects’ food source and breeding grounds:

  • Decaying animal flesh
  • Feces
  • Garbage
  • Rotting meat

Reproduction

A female bottle fly can lay in excess of 2,000 eggs in a lifetime. The eggs are pale yellow or gray in color. Resulting larvae measure 9 to 22 mm in length and may hatch within two to three days, depending on temperature. Within two to 10 days, larvae seek pupation sites, from which they eventually emerge as adult flies. Bottle flies breed in damp, organic matter such as dead animals.

Bottle flies are also good pollinators. They often pollinate flowers with strong odors, such as pawpaws and goldenrod. When food sources are diminished, they feed upon the nectar of these flowers in order to produce healthy eggs.

Blue Bottle Flies in the Home

Green Bottle Flies