Termite Eggs

The termite lifecycle begins with a fertilized egg. A termite egg is very small, white and oval-shaped. Since termite eggs are laid deep inside the nest, people rarely can see them. In fact, subterranean termite nests often are located 4 to 18 inches below ground and drywood termite nests typically are concealed within structures, including walls and furniture.

The Queen Termite
The queen termite is primarily responsible for laying eggs and increasing the colony’s size. However, in some large termite colonies, secondary and tertiary reproductives also lay termite eggs to support the colony’s growth.

After the queen lays her eggs, worker termites move the eggs to incubation chambers and care for them until they hatch. Termite eggs incubate for a couple of weeks before hatching into larvae. Once the termite eggs hatch into immature termites, the workers move them to nursery chambers for feeding and grooming.

A queen termite lays eggs at a steady rate each day and can maintain peak egg production for up to 10 years. The exact number of eggs a queen produces varies based on the termite queen’s age and species. In warmer climates, a termite queen may lay eggs year round. However, in colder climates, egg production may cease during the winter.

Termite Control

How do you know if you have termites?

Learn the signs to look for to determine if you might have a termite infestation.

Why should you be worried?

Termites cost Americans more than $5 billion in damage each year and most insurance plans don’t cover the damage.

Schedule a FREE inspection

We’ll determine whether you actually have termites, then discuss a treatment plan including financing that works for you.

What Orkin does.

Learn what to expect from your Orkin Man and the AIM process.