Termite Life Cycle

Stages in the Termite Life Cycle

Termite Life Cycle Infographic
Termite Life Cycle Infographic

Mating Flight
The life cycle of the termite begins with a mating flight, wherein swarming winged reproductive males and females leave established colonies and procreate.

After fertilization, winged termites land and shed their wings, going on to form new colonies. These insects then become the king or queen termites of their newly established colonies. The queen and king termites are at the center of the termite life cycle and are responsible for reproduction.

Eggs
After the fertilized queen lays her eggs, they hatch into pale white larvae. 

Molting
Eggs hatch into larvae and molt (shed their exoskeletons) to develop into workers, soldiers, primary reproductives and secondary reproductives. A nymph is a young termite that is going through molts to become a reproductive.

The termite growth process begins with a process called molting. First, a termite develops a soft exoskeleton under its current, hard exoskeleton. Then, once the termite has reached maturity, its outermost skeleton splits open, and the new exoskeleton enlarges and hardens. This molting process continues throughout a termite’s life cycle based on the colony’s needs.

Larvae
Over the course of several molts, these larvae grow to assume a role in one of the three termite colony castes: workers, soldiers and reproductive termites, also known as alates.

Sizes of various termites in a colony:
soldier, worker, nymph, larvae
Left to right: soldier, worker, nymph, larvae.

Castes
Each caste has a distinctly different physical appearance. Workers are responsible for constructing tunnels and chambers as well as feeding and grooming other termite castes. Soldier termites are yellow-brown in color, with dramatically enlarged heads and often large mandibles. These are useful in combat but render warriors incapable of feeding themselves. The reproductive alates are darker in color and are born with two pairs of wings.

Although it is not clear how larvae are relegated to a certain caste, some research has indicated that maturity and the overall needs of the colony may dictate caste assignment. In fact, research has indicated that castes in the termite life cycle are not rigidly set, as termites belonging to one caste may develop into another caste if the colony requires it. Thus, a soldier termite may become a worker or a reproductive termite if the colony experiences a shortage of one or the other.

Termite Life Cycle: Reaching Maturity and Swarming
The termite life cycle also includes swarming. Once reproductives become fully mature termites capable of reproducing, they develop wings and functioning eyes. The bodies of these termites, now called alates, also become harder and darker to help the swarming termites withstand exposure to light and less humid air.

Life Span
Workers and soldiers live approximately one to two years. Queen termites may survive for over a decade under optimal climate conditions.

More Life Cycle Information